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Fontaine de Vaucluse
Explore more nearby places in Auvergne - Rhône-Alpes., France

The largest karstic spring in France

Fontaine de Vaucluse is the largest karstic spring flowing in metropolitan France and the fifth largest karstic spring on planet Earth in general.

The emerald green waters of the source are a truly astonishing sight to observe in autumn and spring when the rainfalls and snowmelts bowl up the water bed to the fullest, spilling over 90 cubic meters of water per second right into the Sorgue River.

The Fontaine de Vaucluse spring flows out of a 230-meter-high cliff, creating a natural spectacle that captivates sightseers and nature lovers from all over France, Europe, and the rest of the globe.

Ready to be fascinated? Here is our short guide to your next little French adventure.

Fontaine de Vaucluse – location and getting there

You can find the Fontaine de Vaucluse in the commune of Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, located in the French department of Vaucluse. Both the commune and the department themselves are named after the spring, affirming it to be the essential spot to see around the area.

The area stands about 10 km away from l’Isle sur la Sorgue, south of La Roque sur Pernes and also about 35 km east of Avignon.

Fontaine de Vaucluse – history and further details

The Fontaine de Vaucluse formed five to six million years ago, sometime during the latter part of the Messinian age.

The spring itself is merely the exit point of a 1,100-square-kilometre underground basin, which seizes enormous quantities of water from Mont Ventoux, the Vaucluse Mountains, and many other sources.

The place is a natural and cultural hotspot, as far as history is concerned. Many local archaeological discoveries have nowadays collected more than 1,600 unique objects, dating from the 1st century BC to the first part of the 5th century AD.

What else is there to see and to around Fontaine de Vaucluse

The area is accommodated for maintaining several leisure activities for all types of visitors. They include hiking, fishing, crafting, taking part in some exceptional seasonal events, and enjoying the artificial swimming pool near the spring.

Visiting the Fontaine de Vaucluse can yet be combined with a visit to other local landmarks and sightseeing locations, such as the remains of the Roman Canal on the River Sorgue, the Petrarque, and Renaissance Museums, and Ecomusée du gouffre – an astonishing cave museum that is underwater.

Chemin de la Fontaine, 84800 Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, France

Where is it on the Map?

Chemin de la Fontaine, 84800 Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, France

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Explore more nearby places in Auvergne - Rhône-Alpes., France
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The largest karstic spring in France

Fontaine de Vaucluse is the largest karstic spring flowing in metropolitan France and the fifth largest karstic spring on planet Earth in general.

The emerald green waters of the source are a truly astonishing sight to observe in autumn and spring when the rainfalls and snowmelts bowl up the water bed to the fullest, spilling over 90 cubic meters of water per second right into the Sorgue River.

The Fontaine de Vaucluse spring flows out of a 230-meter-high cliff, creating a natural spectacle that captivates sightseers and nature lovers from all over France, Europe, and the rest of the globe.

Ready to be fascinated? Here is our short guide to your next little French adventure.

Fontaine de Vaucluse – location and getting there

You can find the Fontaine de Vaucluse in the commune of Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, located in the French department of Vaucluse. Both the commune and the department themselves are named after the spring, affirming it to be the essential spot to see around the area.

The area stands about 10 km away from l’Isle sur la Sorgue, south of La Roque sur Pernes and also about 35 km east of Avignon.

Fontaine de Vaucluse – history and further details

The Fontaine de Vaucluse formed five to six million years ago, sometime during the latter part of the Messinian age.

The spring itself is merely the exit point of a 1,100-square-kilometre underground basin, which seizes enormous quantities of water from Mont Ventoux, the Vaucluse Mountains, and many other sources.

The place is a natural and cultural hotspot, as far as history is concerned. Many local archaeological discoveries have nowadays collected more than 1,600 unique objects, dating from the 1st century BC to the first part of the 5th century AD.

What else is there to see and to around Fontaine de Vaucluse

The area is accommodated for maintaining several leisure activities for all types of visitors. They include hiking, fishing, crafting, taking part in some exceptional seasonal events, and enjoying the artificial swimming pool near the spring.

Visiting the Fontaine de Vaucluse can yet be combined with a visit to other local landmarks and sightseeing locations, such as the remains of the Roman Canal on the River Sorgue, the Petrarque, and Renaissance Museums, and Ecomusée du gouffre – an astonishing cave museum that is underwater.

Chemin de la Fontaine, 84800 Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, France

Where is it on the Map?

Chemin de la Fontaine, 84800 Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, France

Explore more places in Europe

See more in Can't retrieve term. In case if you changed taxonomy slug for this term, please update widget settings to use new taxonomy slug.
Explore more nearby places in Auvergne - Rhône-Alpes., France

The largest karstic spring in France

Fontaine de Vaucluse is the largest karstic spring flowing in metropolitan France and the fifth largest karstic spring on planet Earth in general.

The emerald green waters of the source are a truly astonishing sight to observe in autumn and spring when the rainfalls and snowmelts bowl up the water bed to the fullest, spilling over 90 cubic meters of water per second right into the Sorgue River.

The Fontaine de Vaucluse spring flows out of a 230-meter-high cliff, creating a natural spectacle that captivates sightseers and nature lovers from all over France, Europe, and the rest of the globe.

Ready to be fascinated? Here is our short guide to your next little French adventure.

Fontaine de Vaucluse – location and getting there

You can find the Fontaine de Vaucluse in the commune of Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, located in the French department of Vaucluse. Both the commune and the department themselves are named after the spring, affirming it to be the essential spot to see around the area.

The area stands about 10 km away from l’Isle sur la Sorgue, south of La Roque sur Pernes and also about 35 km east of Avignon.

Fontaine de Vaucluse – history and further details

The Fontaine de Vaucluse formed five to six million years ago, sometime during the latter part of the Messinian age.

The spring itself is merely the exit point of a 1,100-square-kilometre underground basin, which seizes enormous quantities of water from Mont Ventoux, the Vaucluse Mountains, and many other sources.

The place is a natural and cultural hotspot, as far as history is concerned. Many local archaeological discoveries have nowadays collected more than 1,600 unique objects, dating from the 1st century BC to the first part of the 5th century AD.

What else is there to see and to around Fontaine de Vaucluse

The area is accommodated for maintaining several leisure activities for all types of visitors. They include hiking, fishing, crafting, taking part in some exceptional seasonal events, and enjoying the artificial swimming pool near the spring.

Visiting the Fontaine de Vaucluse can yet be combined with a visit to other local landmarks and sightseeing locations, such as the remains of the Roman Canal on the River Sorgue, the Petrarque, and Renaissance Museums, and Ecomusée du gouffre – an astonishing cave museum that is underwater.

Chemin de la Fontaine, 84800 Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, France

Where is it on the Map?

Chemin de la Fontaine, 84800 Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, France

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