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Île Callot
Explore more nearby places in Brittany, France

A pilgrimage point, a dragon nest, and a protected area

Île Callot, or the Callot island, is a Breton island that stands on the opposite side of the port of Carantec. It is located in the department of Finistère, in the famous Brittany region of France.

This petite pastoral gem is shaped like a seahorse, accessible only at low tide, and continually draws people in love with Europe’s uncovered beauty – untouched, rustic, and ambient.

Geography and accessibility

Mainly made up of little creeks, dunes, meadows, and pasturages, Île Callot is about 2.2 km long and measures from 10 to 500 m wide in its different areas. Its highest point is almost 40 meters above sea level and is marked by the lovely chapel of Notre Dame de Callot. 

Back to geography and accessibility – the Callot Island is only accessible at low tide by going through a little causeway that covers and uncovers with the flow, as well as by taking the Passe aux Moutons – the natural sandbank on which the Rulands Islands are located. 

The small path, also called The Sheep Pass, probably because the island was once a communal land where the herds of the mainland breeders were pastured, is located approximately at the mid-tide level. When planning your trip, you will definitely have to check the tide times and the crossing times, to have the most satisfying experience of the Callot island and its natural treasury.

The immersible island path is roughly 800 meters long, so if you are up to a family walk from the port, you should plan anything between two or three hours for the entire round trip.

 What is there to see and do around the island

If you need a brief and manageable checklist of the most attractive points to look for around the island, we are proud to provide you with one:

  • Notre Dame de Callot Chapel. The chapel’s history dates back to the very beginning of the 5th century when the Bretons baptized the island. Before that, it was believed to have been a place of pilgrimage and pre-Christian cults and offerings. 
  • The abandoned island school, which nowadays hosts various temporary exhibitions, mostly during the summer season. The exhibits usually consist of sculptures, photographs, and paintings from local and international artists.
  • Château du Taureau  – an old military fort located at the end of the island bay. It was constructed in the middle of the 16th century and later restored by Vauban – a famous French military engineer who served during the reign of Louis XIV.
  • The Toul-ar-Serpent cave, where legend has it that Saint Carantec slaughtered a dragon, whose claws left their imprints, still visible on a nearby rock.

Of course, the Callot island also offers a spectacular natural outlook, super suitable for just strolling around and enjoying yourself for hours. You can sunbathe, tour the little beaches and dunes around, as well as savor the northern part of the peninsula, which is officially a protected area under the governance of the General Council of Finistère. Some parts of the island are also famous bird sanctuaries appreciated by both locals and tourists.

All types of additional information, support, and tour recommendations are freely available at the local Carantec Tourist Office. Experts will eagerly answer your questions and help you make the best out of your visit to the Callot island. 

And what about us? We have captured the vibe to bring it to you, wherever on Earth you might be right now. Because we Travel in Pink, and you are always invited to join us.

 

 

Île Callot, 29660 Carantec, France

Where is it on the Map?

Île Callot, 29660 Carantec, France

Explore more places in Europe

Explore more nearby places in Brittany, France
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A pilgrimage point, a dragon nest, and a protected area

Île Callot, or the Callot island, is a Breton island that stands on the opposite side of the port of Carantec. It is located in the department of Finistère, in the famous Brittany region of France.

This petite pastoral gem is shaped like a seahorse, accessible only at low tide, and continually draws people in love with Europe’s uncovered beauty – untouched, rustic, and ambient.

Geography and accessibility

Mainly made up of little creeks, dunes, meadows, and pasturages, Île Callot is about 2.2 km long and measures from 10 to 500 m wide in its different areas. Its highest point is almost 40 meters above sea level and is marked by the lovely chapel of Notre Dame de Callot. 

Back to geography and accessibility – the Callot Island is only accessible at low tide by going through a little causeway that covers and uncovers with the flow, as well as by taking the Passe aux Moutons – the natural sandbank on which the Rulands Islands are located. 

The small path, also called The Sheep Pass, probably because the island was once a communal land where the herds of the mainland breeders were pastured, is located approximately at the mid-tide level. When planning your trip, you will definitely have to check the tide times and the crossing times, to have the most satisfying experience of the Callot island and its natural treasury.

The immersible island path is roughly 800 meters long, so if you are up to a family walk from the port, you should plan anything between two or three hours for the entire round trip.

 What is there to see and do around the island

If you need a brief and manageable checklist of the most attractive points to look for around the island, we are proud to provide you with one:

  • Notre Dame de Callot Chapel. The chapel’s history dates back to the very beginning of the 5th century when the Bretons baptized the island. Before that, it was believed to have been a place of pilgrimage and pre-Christian cults and offerings. 
  • The abandoned island school, which nowadays hosts various temporary exhibitions, mostly during the summer season. The exhibits usually consist of sculptures, photographs, and paintings from local and international artists.
  • Château du Taureau  – an old military fort located at the end of the island bay. It was constructed in the middle of the 16th century and later restored by Vauban – a famous French military engineer who served during the reign of Louis XIV.
  • The Toul-ar-Serpent cave, where legend has it that Saint Carantec slaughtered a dragon, whose claws left their imprints, still visible on a nearby rock.

Of course, the Callot island also offers a spectacular natural outlook, super suitable for just strolling around and enjoying yourself for hours. You can sunbathe, tour the little beaches and dunes around, as well as savor the northern part of the peninsula, which is officially a protected area under the governance of the General Council of Finistère. Some parts of the island are also famous bird sanctuaries appreciated by both locals and tourists.

All types of additional information, support, and tour recommendations are freely available at the local Carantec Tourist Office. Experts will eagerly answer your questions and help you make the best out of your visit to the Callot island. 

And what about us? We have captured the vibe to bring it to you, wherever on Earth you might be right now. Because we Travel in Pink, and you are always invited to join us.

 

 

Île Callot, 29660 Carantec, France

Where is it on the Map?

Île Callot, 29660 Carantec, France

Explore more places in Europe

See more in Can't retrieve term. In case if you changed taxonomy slug for this term, please update widget settings to use new taxonomy slug.
Explore more nearby places in Brittany, France

A pilgrimage point, a dragon nest, and a protected area

Île Callot, or the Callot island, is a Breton island that stands on the opposite side of the port of Carantec. It is located in the department of Finistère, in the famous Brittany region of France.

This petite pastoral gem is shaped like a seahorse, accessible only at low tide, and continually draws people in love with Europe’s uncovered beauty – untouched, rustic, and ambient.

Geography and accessibility

Mainly made up of little creeks, dunes, meadows, and pasturages, Île Callot is about 2.2 km long and measures from 10 to 500 m wide in its different areas. Its highest point is almost 40 meters above sea level and is marked by the lovely chapel of Notre Dame de Callot. 

Back to geography and accessibility – the Callot Island is only accessible at low tide by going through a little causeway that covers and uncovers with the flow, as well as by taking the Passe aux Moutons – the natural sandbank on which the Rulands Islands are located. 

The small path, also called The Sheep Pass, probably because the island was once a communal land where the herds of the mainland breeders were pastured, is located approximately at the mid-tide level. When planning your trip, you will definitely have to check the tide times and the crossing times, to have the most satisfying experience of the Callot island and its natural treasury.

The immersible island path is roughly 800 meters long, so if you are up to a family walk from the port, you should plan anything between two or three hours for the entire round trip.

 What is there to see and do around the island

If you need a brief and manageable checklist of the most attractive points to look for around the island, we are proud to provide you with one:

  • Notre Dame de Callot Chapel. The chapel’s history dates back to the very beginning of the 5th century when the Bretons baptized the island. Before that, it was believed to have been a place of pilgrimage and pre-Christian cults and offerings. 
  • The abandoned island school, which nowadays hosts various temporary exhibitions, mostly during the summer season. The exhibits usually consist of sculptures, photographs, and paintings from local and international artists.
  • Château du Taureau  – an old military fort located at the end of the island bay. It was constructed in the middle of the 16th century and later restored by Vauban – a famous French military engineer who served during the reign of Louis XIV.
  • The Toul-ar-Serpent cave, where legend has it that Saint Carantec slaughtered a dragon, whose claws left their imprints, still visible on a nearby rock.

Of course, the Callot island also offers a spectacular natural outlook, super suitable for just strolling around and enjoying yourself for hours. You can sunbathe, tour the little beaches and dunes around, as well as savor the northern part of the peninsula, which is officially a protected area under the governance of the General Council of Finistère. Some parts of the island are also famous bird sanctuaries appreciated by both locals and tourists.

All types of additional information, support, and tour recommendations are freely available at the local Carantec Tourist Office. Experts will eagerly answer your questions and help you make the best out of your visit to the Callot island. 

And what about us? We have captured the vibe to bring it to you, wherever on Earth you might be right now. Because we Travel in Pink, and you are always invited to join us.

 

 

Île Callot, 29660 Carantec, France

Where is it on the Map?

Île Callot, 29660 Carantec, France

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