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The famous Rialto Bridge
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Interconnecting Venice since the 16th century

The Rialto Bridge, also known among the locals as Ponte di Rialto, is a Renaissance masterpiece, an essential piece of Venice’s cultural background, and one of the city’s main tourist attractions nowadays. Its impressive stone arch is crossing over the Grand Canal’s narrowest point, interconnecting the districts of San Marco and San Polo in the heart of Venice.

We have gathered the essentials on the Rialto Bridge’s history and architecture to help you grasp its magnificence and enrich your experience of visual representation available in our HD video from the spot.

Rialto Bridge history and timeline

Rialto Bridge is officially the oldest of the four bridges crossing the Grand Canal of Venice.

The first construction to be ever-present on the spot was a 12th-century pontoon bridge – a permanent, floating wooden bridge that used to be known as Ponte Della Moneta. 

Its structure was rather unstable and was, therefore, rebuilt at least two times during the 13th century – first in 1255, and then once again in 1264. These reconstructions didn’t make a big difference, and Ponte della Moneta ultimately collapsed to be replaced by the Rialto Bridge.

The Rialto Bridge itself was constructed in the closing years of the 16th century by Antonio da Ponte and his nephew – Antonio Contino. It is world-renowned as an exemplary engineering achievement of Renaissance architecture and has gained immense popularity ever since.

Another interesting detail is that the Rialto Bridge actually served as the only solid structure spanning the Grand Canal until the middle of the 19th century. Before that, pedestrian overpasses were done by gondola ferries solely.

Rialto Bridge architecture and specifics

The Rialto Bridge is made of a single stone-arch span that underpins a broader rectangular level displaying two rows of little shops. They are readily accessible to visitors and sell jewelry, clothing, Murano glass, and various tourist goods. 

The platform’s massive stone structure was established on around 12,000 timber pilings that still carry the bridge more than four centuries later. 

The lower part of the bridge arch was designed to allow the passage of galleys and boats, while its upper part is made mainly of uneven stairs. Unfortunately, that makes it challenging for people with reduced mobility to experience the bridge without mild discomfort.

Crossing the Rialto Bridge is an absolute must for everyone when in Venice. It is an amazingly beautiful and spirited place – full of natural, historical, and cultural abundance, as virtually every inch of Venice is. 

Bon Voyage from Travel in Pink!
Rialto Bridge, Sestiere San Polo, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy

Where is it on the Map?

Rialto Bridge, Sestiere San Polo, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy

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Explore more nearby places in Italy, Veneto
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Interconnecting Venice since the 16th century

The Rialto Bridge, also known among the locals as Ponte di Rialto, is a Renaissance masterpiece, an essential piece of Venice’s cultural background, and one of the city’s main tourist attractions nowadays. Its impressive stone arch is crossing over the Grand Canal’s narrowest point, interconnecting the districts of San Marco and San Polo in the heart of Venice.

We have gathered the essentials on the Rialto Bridge’s history and architecture to help you grasp its magnificence and enrich your experience of visual representation available in our HD video from the spot.

Rialto Bridge history and timeline

Rialto Bridge is officially the oldest of the four bridges crossing the Grand Canal of Venice.

The first construction to be ever-present on the spot was a 12th-century pontoon bridge – a permanent, floating wooden bridge that used to be known as Ponte Della Moneta. 

Its structure was rather unstable and was, therefore, rebuilt at least two times during the 13th century – first in 1255, and then once again in 1264. These reconstructions didn’t make a big difference, and Ponte della Moneta ultimately collapsed to be replaced by the Rialto Bridge.

The Rialto Bridge itself was constructed in the closing years of the 16th century by Antonio da Ponte and his nephew – Antonio Contino. It is world-renowned as an exemplary engineering achievement of Renaissance architecture and has gained immense popularity ever since.

Another interesting detail is that the Rialto Bridge actually served as the only solid structure spanning the Grand Canal until the middle of the 19th century. Before that, pedestrian overpasses were done by gondola ferries solely.

Rialto Bridge architecture and specifics

The Rialto Bridge is made of a single stone-arch span that underpins a broader rectangular level displaying two rows of little shops. They are readily accessible to visitors and sell jewelry, clothing, Murano glass, and various tourist goods. 

The platform’s massive stone structure was established on around 12,000 timber pilings that still carry the bridge more than four centuries later. 

The lower part of the bridge arch was designed to allow the passage of galleys and boats, while its upper part is made mainly of uneven stairs. Unfortunately, that makes it challenging for people with reduced mobility to experience the bridge without mild discomfort.

Crossing the Rialto Bridge is an absolute must for everyone when in Venice. It is an amazingly beautiful and spirited place – full of natural, historical, and cultural abundance, as virtually every inch of Venice is. 

Bon Voyage from Travel in Pink!
Rialto Bridge, Sestiere San Polo, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy

Where is it on the Map?

Rialto Bridge, Sestiere San Polo, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy

Explore more places in Europe

See more in Can't retrieve term. In case if you changed taxonomy slug for this term, please update widget settings to use new taxonomy slug.
Explore more nearby places in Italy, Veneto

Interconnecting Venice since the 16th century

The Rialto Bridge, also known among the locals as Ponte di Rialto, is a Renaissance masterpiece, an essential piece of Venice’s cultural background, and one of the city’s main tourist attractions nowadays. Its impressive stone arch is crossing over the Grand Canal’s narrowest point, interconnecting the districts of San Marco and San Polo in the heart of Venice.

We have gathered the essentials on the Rialto Bridge’s history and architecture to help you grasp its magnificence and enrich your experience of visual representation available in our HD video from the spot.

Rialto Bridge history and timeline

Rialto Bridge is officially the oldest of the four bridges crossing the Grand Canal of Venice.

The first construction to be ever-present on the spot was a 12th-century pontoon bridge – a permanent, floating wooden bridge that used to be known as Ponte Della Moneta. 

Its structure was rather unstable and was, therefore, rebuilt at least two times during the 13th century – first in 1255, and then once again in 1264. These reconstructions didn’t make a big difference, and Ponte della Moneta ultimately collapsed to be replaced by the Rialto Bridge.

The Rialto Bridge itself was constructed in the closing years of the 16th century by Antonio da Ponte and his nephew – Antonio Contino. It is world-renowned as an exemplary engineering achievement of Renaissance architecture and has gained immense popularity ever since.

Another interesting detail is that the Rialto Bridge actually served as the only solid structure spanning the Grand Canal until the middle of the 19th century. Before that, pedestrian overpasses were done by gondola ferries solely.

Rialto Bridge architecture and specifics

The Rialto Bridge is made of a single stone-arch span that underpins a broader rectangular level displaying two rows of little shops. They are readily accessible to visitors and sell jewelry, clothing, Murano glass, and various tourist goods. 

The platform’s massive stone structure was established on around 12,000 timber pilings that still carry the bridge more than four centuries later. 

The lower part of the bridge arch was designed to allow the passage of galleys and boats, while its upper part is made mainly of uneven stairs. Unfortunately, that makes it challenging for people with reduced mobility to experience the bridge without mild discomfort.

Crossing the Rialto Bridge is an absolute must for everyone when in Venice. It is an amazingly beautiful and spirited place – full of natural, historical, and cultural abundance, as virtually every inch of Venice is. 

Bon Voyage from Travel in Pink!
Rialto Bridge, Sestiere San Polo, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy

Where is it on the Map?

Rialto Bridge, Sestiere San Polo, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy

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