fbpx
The Roman Ferreres Aqueduct
Explore more nearby places in Catalonia, Spain

The bridge of The Devil

The Ferreres Aqueduct in Catalonia is a traditional Roman water channel constructed to provide water to the ancient city of Tarraco, nowadays going by the name of Tarragona. The aqueduct was built sometime throughout the 1st century, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus.

As the most massive aqueduct in Catalonia, The Devil’s Bridge is also a vital part of the spectacular Archaeological ensemble of Tarraco, named a UNESCO world heritage site back in 2000.

Ready to travel in time and space? Here is everything you need to know before your epic trip.

Physical specifications of the construction

The banks of the conduit are made of cuboid stone blocks, formed in the precisely same pattern. The inner sections of the columns, on the other hand, consist of mortar, concrete gaskets, and miniature stones.

The aqueduct’s bridge is almost 220 meters long and nearly 30 meters high. Its composition consists of two levels of arches, laced one on top of the other. There are 11 arches in the base level, along with 25 arches on the upper level.

These arches are around 6 meters long, 6 meters high, and 2 meters thick. The result is a stunning stone assembly, bringing the epicness of ancient Rome right into the heart of the modern world.

The aqueduct was renovated and strengthened numerous times throughout the history of its existence, including in the 20th century.

What does the Devil have to do with it?

You’ve probably been asking yourself that question since the very beginning of our story. So here it is. “The Devil’s Bridge” is backed by a particularly intriguing ancient legend concerning the erection of the structure.

In Roman times, as soon as the original bridge was completed, a vicious wind started blowing and eventually blew the whole thing away in no more than one night. When the architect saw what happened, he swore that no one but the Devil himself would be able to build a long-standing bridge in this godforsaken place. So, the Devil, as you may suggest, came along and offered to build the bridge.

In return, he wanted the soul of the first man ever to drink a sip of water from his aqueduct. The master agreed, had the Devil build the colossal bridge over just one night, and then sent a monkey to drink from it first. A rather Catalonian thing to do, isn’t it?

Walking the bridge of the Devil is nowadays free, and publically accessible throughout the year. Are you ready for a wild ride?

Unnamed Road, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

Where is it on the Map?

Unnamed Road, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

Explore more places in Europe

Explore more nearby places in Catalonia, Spain
See more in Can't retrieve term. In case if you changed taxonomy slug for this term, please update widget settings to use new taxonomy slug.

The bridge of The Devil

The Ferreres Aqueduct in Catalonia is a traditional Roman water channel constructed to provide water to the ancient city of Tarraco, nowadays going by the name of Tarragona. The aqueduct was built sometime throughout the 1st century, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus.

As the most massive aqueduct in Catalonia, The Devil’s Bridge is also a vital part of the spectacular Archaeological ensemble of Tarraco, named a UNESCO world heritage site back in 2000.

Ready to travel in time and space? Here is everything you need to know before your epic trip.

Physical specifications of the construction

The banks of the conduit are made of cuboid stone blocks, formed in the precisely same pattern. The inner sections of the columns, on the other hand, consist of mortar, concrete gaskets, and miniature stones.

The aqueduct’s bridge is almost 220 meters long and nearly 30 meters high. Its composition consists of two levels of arches, laced one on top of the other. There are 11 arches in the base level, along with 25 arches on the upper level.

These arches are around 6 meters long, 6 meters high, and 2 meters thick. The result is a stunning stone assembly, bringing the epicness of ancient Rome right into the heart of the modern world.

The aqueduct was renovated and strengthened numerous times throughout the history of its existence, including in the 20th century.

What does the Devil have to do with it?

You’ve probably been asking yourself that question since the very beginning of our story. So here it is. “The Devil’s Bridge” is backed by a particularly intriguing ancient legend concerning the erection of the structure.

In Roman times, as soon as the original bridge was completed, a vicious wind started blowing and eventually blew the whole thing away in no more than one night. When the architect saw what happened, he swore that no one but the Devil himself would be able to build a long-standing bridge in this godforsaken place. So, the Devil, as you may suggest, came along and offered to build the bridge.

In return, he wanted the soul of the first man ever to drink a sip of water from his aqueduct. The master agreed, had the Devil build the colossal bridge over just one night, and then sent a monkey to drink from it first. A rather Catalonian thing to do, isn’t it?

Walking the bridge of the Devil is nowadays free, and publically accessible throughout the year. Are you ready for a wild ride?

Unnamed Road, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

Where is it on the Map?

Unnamed Road, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

Explore more places in Europe

See more in Can't retrieve term. In case if you changed taxonomy slug for this term, please update widget settings to use new taxonomy slug.
Explore more nearby places in Catalonia, Spain

The bridge of The Devil

The Ferreres Aqueduct in Catalonia is a traditional Roman water channel constructed to provide water to the ancient city of Tarraco, nowadays going by the name of Tarragona. The aqueduct was built sometime throughout the 1st century, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus.

As the most massive aqueduct in Catalonia, The Devil’s Bridge is also a vital part of the spectacular Archaeological ensemble of Tarraco, named a UNESCO world heritage site back in 2000.

Ready to travel in time and space? Here is everything you need to know before your epic trip.

Physical specifications of the construction

The banks of the conduit are made of cuboid stone blocks, formed in the precisely same pattern. The inner sections of the columns, on the other hand, consist of mortar, concrete gaskets, and miniature stones.

The aqueduct’s bridge is almost 220 meters long and nearly 30 meters high. Its composition consists of two levels of arches, laced one on top of the other. There are 11 arches in the base level, along with 25 arches on the upper level.

These arches are around 6 meters long, 6 meters high, and 2 meters thick. The result is a stunning stone assembly, bringing the epicness of ancient Rome right into the heart of the modern world.

The aqueduct was renovated and strengthened numerous times throughout the history of its existence, including in the 20th century.

What does the Devil have to do with it?

You’ve probably been asking yourself that question since the very beginning of our story. So here it is. “The Devil’s Bridge” is backed by a particularly intriguing ancient legend concerning the erection of the structure.

In Roman times, as soon as the original bridge was completed, a vicious wind started blowing and eventually blew the whole thing away in no more than one night. When the architect saw what happened, he swore that no one but the Devil himself would be able to build a long-standing bridge in this godforsaken place. So, the Devil, as you may suggest, came along and offered to build the bridge.

In return, he wanted the soul of the first man ever to drink a sip of water from his aqueduct. The master agreed, had the Devil build the colossal bridge over just one night, and then sent a monkey to drink from it first. A rather Catalonian thing to do, isn’t it?

Walking the bridge of the Devil is nowadays free, and publically accessible throughout the year. Are you ready for a wild ride?

Unnamed Road, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

Where is it on the Map?

Unnamed Road, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

© 2018 - 2020 Copyright by Travel in Pink/Cloud Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved.

No content may be copied without prior written approval.