fbpx
Village Troglodytique de la Madeleine
Explore more nearby places in France, New Aquitaine

The troglodyte rock adventure – visiting the Caves of Madeleine and Saint Christophe

The caves of Madeleine and Saint Christophe are two of the most exceptional natural phenomena to visit in the Vézère Valley, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site itself. They offer a spectacular beauty, combined with many well-preserved troglodyte discoveries, altogether forming the ultimate bundle of experiences for both nature lovers and history connoisseurs. Both of the caves are located in the Périgord natural region near Dordogne, France.

What is there to see, do, and experience near this couple of remarkable prehistoric caves? Here are a few paragraphs that will prepare you for the grand troglodyte rock adventure.

The Cave of Madeleine

The La Madeleine Grand site is a natural rock shelter that had evidently been occupied by human tribes dating back to about 17,000 years ago. The area is especially rich in historically significant prehistoric carvings and pieces of art that are nowadays distributed among more than 50 different museums from all over the world.

The prehistoric shelter is currently not open to visitors. Still, there is a lot more to be observed around since the latest settlers kept on living inside the caves until the Middle Ages. By this time, the cavities are converted into a troglodyte village by enhancing the original cave walls and adding additional stones. The remains of a 15-th century Gothic Chapel is one of the most exotic things to see carved inside the rocks.

The site is open for visitors from March until mid-November. A visit lasts about an hour, after which the tourists can enjoy a pleasant couple of hours in the nearby picknick area.

The Cave of Saint Christophe

La Roque Saint Christophe is a natural formation of cavities and rock shelters that were inhabited by human beings from prehistorical times up to the beginning of the Renaissance. One of the most astonishing natural formations around the area of this troglodytic village is undoubtedly the main rock shelter itself – it is one kilometer long and over sixty meters high. The medieval town and fortress outside the cave are an integral part of the site, so you can’t afford to miss them once you are already there.

This site is open all-year-round, but guided tours around it are available only in July and August. Every visitor is welcomed with a special explanatory brochure that provides plenty of additional details about the region.

Unnamed Road Tursac, Nouvelle-Aquitaine. France ,24620

Where is it on the Map?

Unnamed Road Tursac, Nouvelle-Aquitaine. France ,24620

Explore more places in Europe

Explore more nearby places in France, New Aquitaine
See more in Can't retrieve term. In case if you changed taxonomy slug for this term, please update widget settings to use new taxonomy slug.

The troglodyte rock adventure – visiting the Caves of Madeleine and Saint Christophe

The caves of Madeleine and Saint Christophe are two of the most exceptional natural phenomena to visit in the Vézère Valley, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site itself. They offer a spectacular beauty, combined with many well-preserved troglodyte discoveries, altogether forming the ultimate bundle of experiences for both nature lovers and history connoisseurs. Both of the caves are located in the Périgord natural region near Dordogne, France.

What is there to see, do, and experience near this couple of remarkable prehistoric caves? Here are a few paragraphs that will prepare you for the grand troglodyte rock adventure.

The Cave of Madeleine

The La Madeleine Grand site is a natural rock shelter that had evidently been occupied by human tribes dating back to about 17,000 years ago. The area is especially rich in historically significant prehistoric carvings and pieces of art that are nowadays distributed among more than 50 different museums from all over the world.

The prehistoric shelter is currently not open to visitors. Still, there is a lot more to be observed around since the latest settlers kept on living inside the caves until the Middle Ages. By this time, the cavities are converted into a troglodyte village by enhancing the original cave walls and adding additional stones. The remains of a 15-th century Gothic Chapel is one of the most exotic things to see carved inside the rocks.

The site is open for visitors from March until mid-November. A visit lasts about an hour, after which the tourists can enjoy a pleasant couple of hours in the nearby picknick area.

The Cave of Saint Christophe

La Roque Saint Christophe is a natural formation of cavities and rock shelters that were inhabited by human beings from prehistorical times up to the beginning of the Renaissance. One of the most astonishing natural formations around the area of this troglodytic village is undoubtedly the main rock shelter itself – it is one kilometer long and over sixty meters high. The medieval town and fortress outside the cave are an integral part of the site, so you can’t afford to miss them once you are already there.

This site is open all-year-round, but guided tours around it are available only in July and August. Every visitor is welcomed with a special explanatory brochure that provides plenty of additional details about the region.

Unnamed Road Tursac, Nouvelle-Aquitaine. France ,24620

Where is it on the Map?

Unnamed Road Tursac, Nouvelle-Aquitaine. France ,24620

Explore more places in Europe

See more in Can't retrieve term. In case if you changed taxonomy slug for this term, please update widget settings to use new taxonomy slug.
Explore more nearby places in France, New Aquitaine

The troglodyte rock adventure – visiting the Caves of Madeleine and Saint Christophe

The caves of Madeleine and Saint Christophe are two of the most exceptional natural phenomena to visit in the Vézère Valley, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site itself. They offer a spectacular beauty, combined with many well-preserved troglodyte discoveries, altogether forming the ultimate bundle of experiences for both nature lovers and history connoisseurs. Both of the caves are located in the Périgord natural region near Dordogne, France.

What is there to see, do, and experience near this couple of remarkable prehistoric caves? Here are a few paragraphs that will prepare you for the grand troglodyte rock adventure.

The Cave of Madeleine

The La Madeleine Grand site is a natural rock shelter that had evidently been occupied by human tribes dating back to about 17,000 years ago. The area is especially rich in historically significant prehistoric carvings and pieces of art that are nowadays distributed among more than 50 different museums from all over the world.

The prehistoric shelter is currently not open to visitors. Still, there is a lot more to be observed around since the latest settlers kept on living inside the caves until the Middle Ages. By this time, the cavities are converted into a troglodyte village by enhancing the original cave walls and adding additional stones. The remains of a 15-th century Gothic Chapel is one of the most exotic things to see carved inside the rocks.

The site is open for visitors from March until mid-November. A visit lasts about an hour, after which the tourists can enjoy a pleasant couple of hours in the nearby picknick area.

The Cave of Saint Christophe

La Roque Saint Christophe is a natural formation of cavities and rock shelters that were inhabited by human beings from prehistorical times up to the beginning of the Renaissance. One of the most astonishing natural formations around the area of this troglodytic village is undoubtedly the main rock shelter itself – it is one kilometer long and over sixty meters high. The medieval town and fortress outside the cave are an integral part of the site, so you can’t afford to miss them once you are already there.

This site is open all-year-round, but guided tours around it are available only in July and August. Every visitor is welcomed with a special explanatory brochure that provides plenty of additional details about the region.

Unnamed Road Tursac, Nouvelle-Aquitaine. France ,24620

Where is it on the Map?

Unnamed Road Tursac, Nouvelle-Aquitaine. France ,24620

© 2018 - 2020 Copyright by Travel in Pink/Cloud Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved.

No content may be copied without prior written approval.